Guest Post – Transform your garden into a mini orchard

YouGarden is an online gardening centre run by three horticulturalist who have over 50 years combined experience. They have one simple ethos “Gardening for Everyone” and sell everything for from easy to grow veg and flowers to YouGarden fruit trees and exotic palms.

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Starting your own mini orchard could be easier than you think – providing you choose your plants wisely, there’s no reason why you can’t start growing your own fruit!

Many varieties of fruit thrive in the UK, from apples to pears and peaches to apricots. How successful your crop is will depend on the conditions in your garden, and of course how well you look after the plants.

The good thing is that starting an orchard doesn’t need to take up a lot of space. Not everyone has an expanse of land to start planting apple trees on, hence why mini orchards have become so popular.

How to plant your mini orchard

A great way to grow fruit trees without taking up too much room is to plant them in pots.

This comes with all sorts of advantages – not only is it easier to maintain their size, but if you feel like rearranging your garden once in a while, this shouldn’t be too much of a problem!

All good garden centres and online stockists should have fruit trees ready for you to take home and plant. If you’re lucky, some of them might start bearing fruit sooner than you think.

There are advantages to different types of containers. Clay is heavy and stable, while plastic tends to be weather-proof and durable. Whichever you choose, make sure there is plenty of opportunity for drainage at the bottom – broken up pieces of old clay pots are a great way to achieve this.

 

Keeping your mini orchard healthy

Once your mini orchard has been successfully planted, there are several tasks you will need to carry out every so often to keep the plants in top condition.

Make sure that the trees are watered generously – it is best to allow the surface of the compost to dry out before watering again, but try not to let it become bone dry.

More hardy fruit can be left outdoors during the winter months, but other varieties should be moved inside a greenhouse to protect them against damage.

Every year, you might want to think about replanting your fruit trees into bigger pots to allow the roots to grow. You will eventually find that you no longer need to do this, but it is an especially important process for young trees.

It is also a good idea to prune your trees during the early years, as this can prevent problems from arising in the future.

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Welcome to The Guide to Gay Gardening's new look!


Living in the grey smog of London utopia, I forge my little existence in a slightly loopy, hermity, hippy manner, sharing my life with the hens, cats and other menagerie that have somehow taken over my life.

If I'm not enjoying the great outdoors with my netbook in hand, I'll be snipping, pruning, planting, cutting, propagating, shovelling, or just plain admiring. You can even catch the occasional glimpse of me on the TV now and then!

Take the weight off for a while. Sit back, relax, read, send me feedback, but mostly just take a moment and look around you.....mother nature is beautiful.


Geoff Wakeling

Mail Me: geoffwakeling(at) theguidetogaygardening.com



















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