An early sowing and the first flowers.

Can you believe it’s February? January seems to have rushed by, yet Christmas seems as if it were a year ago already. With so much snow on the ground, followed by drenching rain, there hasn’t exactly been a huge amount of time to get out into the garden. However, the past couple of  days have been positively balmy, and the warmer weather’s got me in the mood for sowing.

Emerging succulent shootsI’ve been lacking on my garden duties, and I spent several hours over the past few days clearing, tidying and cutting back a lot of the foliage that should’ve been chopped last autumn. Much of this didn’t need to be pruned anyway as the sedum heads looks gorgeous in the frost, and the Japaneses anemone’s offered seeds for the birds.

In my discoveries I’ve discovered that many plants are already beginning to burst into life. The pulmonaria, a fantastic plant for early appearing bees, already has buds and some open flowers. Meanwhile, shoots on all manner of plants are starting to appear, bright and luminous green fronds searching for the sun on warm days. Crocus leaves are appearing, and even some of the daffs are already developing the buds, ready to burst into vivid life.

With my green fingers itching to get growing, I couldn’t help but do a little sowing yesterday. I always start too early; pop in hundreds of seeds and then end up with vast quantities of seedlings which can’t go out until they’ve been hardened off. I do the same with my finches too; get a warm day and desperately want to put all the nesting boxes up in the aviary – MUST HOLD OFF. However, there are a few things to plant, so I popped in some sweet peas and broad beans (aquadulce claudia, of course. Would I have it any other way?)

Pulmonaria puts out early flowers

I’ve also got some VERY old seeds from a few years ago. I don’t expect much to come from these astrantia, hosta, eryngium and allium seeds, but I stuck them in anyway. They’re sporadic germinators at best, so a few years wait has probably been enough to kill them. Still, I threw them all in a pot so we’ll see what happens in the next few weeks.

In the meantime, let’s up the snow’s receded for good. The blackbird’s are piping in the air, the sun’s warming the soil. Folks, it’s almost time for spring!!

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Welcome to The Guide to Gay Gardening's new look!


Living in the grey smog of London utopia, I forge my little existence in a slightly loopy, hermity, hippy manner, sharing my life with the hens, cats and other menagerie that have somehow taken over my life.

If I'm not enjoying the great outdoors with my netbook in hand, I'll be snipping, pruning, planting, cutting, propagating, shovelling, or just plain admiring. You can even catch the occasional glimpse of me on the TV now and then!

Take the weight off for a while. Sit back, relax, read, send me feedback, but mostly just take a moment and look around you.....mother nature is beautiful.


Geoff Wakeling

Mail Me: geoffwakeling(at) theguidetogaygardening(dot)com















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